NEW YORK, October 26, 2016 – OppenheimerFunds, a leading global asset manager, announced its new philanthropic initiative 10,000 Kids by 2020, which aims to engage 10,000 students in math literacy programs over the next several years through non-profit partnerships and active employee volunteerism.

The program was unveiled at the annual fundraiser for the Museum of Mathematics (MoMath) in New York City, which hosted more than 200 guests and honored keynote speaker Nate Silver, author and renowned statistician. Among the evening’s speakers, Art Steinmetz, Chairman of the MoMath Board of Trustees and OppenheimerFunds Chairman and CEO, spoke about the firm’s strong partnership with MoMath, which has been a proud supporter and inaugural sponsor since the museum was established.

“As the CEO of a global asset management firm, I believe math literacy is a critical skill for the next generation of investors, entrepreneurs and educators, and we have to start preparing them now by engaging students with mathematics at a young age,” said Steinmetz. “With OppenheimerFunds’ initiative to reach 10,000 Kids by 2020, we hope to make a difference in students’ lives and help get them excited about math.”

To reach the goal of engaging 10,000 kids in math literacy programs, OppenheimerFunds will continue to work closely with MoMath, public schools, and nonprofit organizations such as The Boys and Girls Club of America, an organization that strives to enable all young people to reach their full potential. Additionally, Cross Cultural Solutions, a global volunteer program that delivers real change to communities around the world and a long-time partner of OppenheimerFunds, will include a focus on introducing math literacy programs for underserved children abroad.

Together with these organizations, OppenheimerFunds is working to share the universal language of mathematics in communities in the U.S. and around the world through employee volunteer efforts.

MoMath opened its doors in 2012 with a mission to address the decline in the number of students who excel in math and are preparing for careers in mathematics. Their one-of-a-kind facility provides stimulating and interactive exhibits, as well as traveling displays and programs to make math fun and less intimidating. The Museum, which has had more than half a million visitors in 2016, also organized the second worldwide math conference drawing attendees from 15 countries, held in London this year.